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The Science

Now to the Sticks

If you’ve ever watched a hockey game, you know that hockey players break a lot of the 3.2 million sticks that are made every year. But have you ever wondered what happens to all those broken sticks? You’d like to think they’re recycled, but you’d be wrong. These sticks go right from the ice into a dumpster and out to landfills. Hockey sticks are made from non recyclable carbon composite material, held together with resin made of a lactic acid derivative. Both the stick and resin are completely inert and cannot cause harm to the environment.

 
 

Below are downloadbale pamphlets and flyers you can use to promote your program. Each print out can reflect your participating rink and program primary contacts.

Instructions to create your own habitats for your waterways!

Customizable informative 

pamphlet 

Organize a collection center at your local rink!

 

FGCU is excited to have the National Hockey League’s support for Rink2Reef through its Green Initiative Program. The program promotes energy conservation and waste reduction in the sport and environmental action among fans and partners.

The NHL is collecting broken sticks from hockey rinks throughout North America at the professional, college and scholastic levels, as well as from local hockey clubs and youth leagues, to be converted into artificial oyster reefs at Vester.

“The players took this initiative to the next level by contacting the National Hockey League,” said Wasno. “The National Hockey League has thrown its full support behind this.”

The NHL is promoting the program league-wide and in many coastal communities through introductory flyers, unit construction manuals and community meeting announcements for local rinks.
 

 

                     For more information about the Rink2Reef   Oyster Restoration Project,       

Contact Bob Wasno

rwasno@fgcu.edu

TM

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hockey clubs, click here

For more information on FGCU's

Vester Marine Lab, click here